Webster

The Constitution was made to guard the people against the dangers of good intentions." --American Statesman Daniel Webster (1782-1852)


Monday, November 19, 2018

Monday Music "You Lost that Loving Feeling" By Darryl Hall and John Oats(Cover)

I heard this song on the way home from work on my 80's channel, I remembered the Righteous Brothers version and it was a total departure from what was going on before and it turned into a huge hit for them becoming an iconic song for the duo and it was covered many times.   I decided to roll with the Hall and Oats version of the  song, and they did an excellent job of it, but every time I hear of the song, this is what I think of...
Top Gun Version...
So Shoot me.....LOL

"You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin'" is a song written by Phil Spector, Barry Mann, and Cynthia Weil. It was first recorded by the Righteous Brothers in 1964, produced by Phil Spector. Their recording is considered by some music critics to be the ultimate expression and illustration of Spector's "Wall of Sound" recording technique. It has also been described by various music writers as "one of the best records ever made" and "the ultimate pop record".
The original Righteous Brothers version was a critical and commercial success on its release, becoming a number-one hit single in both the United States and the United Kingdom in February 1965. It was the fifth best selling song of 1965 in the US. It also entered the Top 10 in the UK chart on an unprecedented three separate occasions.
"You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin'" has been covered successfully by numerous artists. In 1965, Cilla Black's recording reached number two in the UK Singles Chart. Dionne Warwick took her version to number 16 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1969. A 1971 duet version by singers Roberta Flack and Donny Hathaway peaked at number 30 on the Billboard R&B singles chart. Long John Baldry charted at number two in Australia with his 1979 remake and a 1980 version by Hall and Oates reached number 12 on the US Hot 100.
In December 1999, the performing-rights organization Broadcast Music, Inc. (BMI) ranked the song as the most-played song on American radio and television in the 20th century, having accumulated more than 8 million airplays by 1999, and nearly 15 million by 2011. Additionally, the song was chosen as one of the Songs of the Century by RIAA and ranked No. 34 on the list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time by Rolling Stone. In 2015, the single was inducted into the National Recording Registry by the Library of Congress for being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".

In 1980, the American musical duo Hall & Oates recorded a cover version of "You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin'" for their ninth studio album Voices. Their version of the song was produced by the duo and included a sparse arrangement contrasting with the lavish Righteous Brothers original version. It was the second non-original song Hall & Oates had ever recorded. According to Oates, this was the very last song recorded for the album, as it had been deemed complete with the other ten tracks. However, Hall and Oates felt that there was "something missing" from the album. Then they came across the Righteous Brothers' version of the song on a jukebox machine while going out to get food and they decided to cover it. They went back to the studio, cut it in a period of four hours, and placed on the album.

The track was issued on RCA Records as the album's second single after the original "How Does It Feel to Be Back" peaked at number 30 on the Billboard Hot 100. The November peak of number 12 on the Hot 100 chart made "You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin'" the first Hall & Oates single to ascend higher than number 20 since the number one hit "Rich Girl" in the spring of 1977."You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin'" also reached number 15 on the Billboard Adult Contemporary chart, on the Radio & Records Airplay chart the song debuted at number 30 on the September 26, 1980 issue, after seven weeks it reached and peaked at number four staying there for one week, the song stayed on the top 10 of the chart for six weeks and remained on it for thirteen. It also reached number 55 in the UK Singles Chart.

2 comments:

  1. LOL, and that crap never happened at the 'O'-clubs, even if people thought it did... Sigh

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  2. My sister was a huge Hall & Oates fan.

    ReplyDelete