Webster

The Constitution was made to guard the people against the dangers of good intentions." --American Statesman Daniel Webster (1782-1852)


Tuesday, August 8, 2017

Underestimating the ANTIFA movement...

ANTIFA has kinda exploded on the scene during the 2016 election cycle.  You saw them mostly attacking Trump supporters.   To an ANTIFA group, they consider us "Nazi's" and sub human.  Now where did they come from?   Well I believe that they are a continuation of the "Occupy Movement"

  Remember them in the 2012 and the 2014 election cycles, the "Occupy" group were center stage as "the Soldiers of Soros".  I have blogged about them frequently.  Now the Occupy groups have grown up into the "ANTIFA" movement.  They are still supported by the same cabal of leftist but now you have municipalities supporting them.  The ANTIFA movement counts as fellow allies, the BLM movement and the environmental groups.  They tend to band together to harass anybody that don't believe like they do.  And nobody can believe like they do because they are "True Believers" and everyone else will fail the ideological litmus test.  In their world, you can't have dissent, because if you do, than you are wrong and deserve to be punished for deviating from dogma.  The ANTIFA movement are the ideological soldiers of the modern Left.


It is easy to mock the ANTIFA movement as mostly feminist and beta males, and to a large extent that is accurate, but there is the hardcore center that well is "Hard". Those are the ones that do all the fighting and bicycling locking people. They have been demonizing their opponents and deriding them as "Nazi's" and when believe that your opponent is sub human, than you lose the "Taking human life" issue off the table because "we are evil and we deserve it." This is a dangerous mindset and the hardcore ANTIFA believe this and those are the ones you have to watch. You never underestimate people, especially since they are a fan of marxism and to use Mao's little red book as a reference "The Guerrilla can swim among the people and be one with them." What is going on is you have the early makings of a insurgency especially when a lot of city government supports them.


 Here are some definations from "Urban Dictionary" when I used the word "ANTIFA"

ANTIFA
Short for (militant) anti-fascists.

Middle-class champagne socialist/communist/anarchist white boys who don't like nationalists or fascists. They consider themselves to be rebelling against the establishment, whilst upholding all of its ultra-politically correct views.

Antifa only dislike racism when its carried out by whites, and do not have the bottle to stand up against anti-white racism; leading to many people on the right to refer to them as 'traitors'. I'd rather just call them morons.

Most are teenagers and university students who grow out of the fad when they start paying taxes.
Antifa is stupid. 

Anti-capitalistic, anti-personal freedom (unless you agree with them) anti-spiritual, anti-point. Harbors a social superiority with lack of civility or natural intelligence. These dim bulbs (at best) can be characterized by, greasy hair, basement dwellings and being totally devoid of any style or attraction. Usually spotted lurking at night in large groups of marauding retards of like mind (or lack thereof) near a large University or College, anywhere they can find safety in shear numbers (because their pussy's) but has been known to venture out in the daylight to antagonize, mace women, light garbage cans and cop cars on fire at DJT rallies for money.
We don't care if you're 80 years old, we are ANTIFA and were delivering a knuckle sandwich old man. 
Short for antifascist

An antifascist is somebody who is usually young, upper to middle class(wo)man who sits in their parents house standing against racism on their computers while sipping expensive wine. Most of them are anarchists or far-leftists such as communists or Marxists (or any socialists for that matter.)

When they get off their computers and go into the real world, they usually flood the streets in packs waving red and black flags symbolizing anarcho-communism, or maybe they just fly black flags or red flags. Since they are too dumb to realize that anarchism and socialism were ideas written from behind a desk and not able to be used in reality.

Usually antifa groups will not fight in a one on one match with a skinhead, they always attack in packs or cells. However, most are vegans and/or hippies so this is understandable since they're all weaklings.

Even if you do not agree with half of what I said, these people are politically correct hippies who adopt the most mainstream political views and then they make it look like they're a special fucking snowflake.







For progressives, Donald Trump is not just another Republican president. Seventy-six percent of Democrats, according to a Suffolk poll from last September, consider him a racist. Last March, according to a YouGov survey, 71 percent of Democrats agreed that his campaign contained “fascist undertones.” All of which raises a question that is likely to bedevil progressives for years to come: If you believe the president of the United States is leading a racist, fascist movement that threatens the rights, if not the lives, of vulnerable minorities, how far are you willing to go to stop it?
In Washington, D.C., the response to that question centers on how members of Congress can oppose Trump’s agenda, on how Democrats can retake the House of Representatives, and on how and when to push for impeachment. But in the country at large, some militant leftists are offering a very different answer. On Inauguration Day, a masked activist punched the white-supremacist leader Richard Spencer. In February, protesters violently disrupted UC Berkeley’s plans to host a speech by Milo Yiannopoulos, a former Breitbart.com editor. In March, protesters pushed and shoved the controversial conservative political scientist Charles Murray when he spoke at Middlebury College, in Vermont.






As far-flung as these incidents were, they have something crucial in common. Like the organizations that opposed the Multnomah County Republican Party’s participation in the 82nd Avenue of Roses Parade, these activists appear to be linked to a movement called “antifa,” which is short for antifascist or Anti-Fascist Action. The movement’s secrecy makes definitively cataloging its activities difficult, but this much is certain: Antifa’s power is growing. And how the rest of the activist left responds will help define its moral character in the Trump age.



 

Antifa traces its roots to the 1920s and ’30s, when militant leftists battled fascists in the streets of Germany, Italy, and Spain. When fascism withered after World War II, antifa did too. But in the ’70s and ’80s, neo-Nazi skinheads began to infiltrate Britain’s punk scene. After the Berlin Wall fell, neo-Nazism also gained prominence in Germany. In response, a cadre of young leftists, including many anarchists and punk fans, revived the tradition of street-level antifascism.

By the 2000s, as the internet facilitated more transatlantic dialogue, some American activists had adopted the name antifa. But even on the militant left, the movement didn’t occupy the spotlight. To most left-wing activists during the Clinton, Bush, and Obama years, deregulated global capitalism seemed like a greater threat than fascism.


Trump has changed that. For antifa, the result has been explosive growth. According to NYC Antifa, the group’s Twitter following nearly quadrupled in the first three weeks of January alone. (By summer, it exceeded 15,000.) Trump’s rise has also bred a new sympathy for antifa among some on the mainstream left. “Suddenly,” noted the antifa-aligned journal It’s Going Down, “anarchists and antifa, who have been demonized and sidelined by the wider Left have been hearing from liberals and Leftists, ‘you’ve been right all along.’ ” An article in The Nation argued that “to call Trumpism fascist” is to realize that it is “not well combated or contained by standard liberal appeals to reason.” The radical left, it said, offers “practical and serious responses in this political moment.”






Those responses sometimes spill blood. Since antifa is heavily composed of anarchists, its activists place little faith in the state, which they consider complicit in fascism and racism. They prefer direct action: They pressure venues to deny people whom they believe to be white supremacists space to meet. They pressure employers to fire them and landlords to evict them. And when people they deem racists and fascists manage to assemble, antifa’s partisans try to break up their gatherings, including by force.




Such tactics have elicited substantial support from the mainstream left. When the masked antifa activist was filmed assaulting Spencer on Inauguration Day, another piece in The Nation described his punch as an act of “kinetic beauty.” Slate ran an approving article about a humorous piano ballad that glorified the assault. Twitter was inundated with viral versions of the video set to different songs, prompting the former Obama speechwriter Jon Favreau to tweet, “I don’t care how many different songs you set Richard Spencer being punched to, I’ll laugh at every one.”



The violence is not directed only at people like Spencer: In June of last year, demonstrators—at least some of whom were associated with antifa—punched and threw eggs at people exiting a Trump rally in San Jose, California. An article in It’s Going Down celebrated the “righteous beatings.”





Antifascists call such actions defensive. Hate speech against vulnerable minorities, they argue, leads to violence against vulnerable minorities. But Trump supporters andalt-right groups see antifa’s attacks as an assault on their right to freely assemble, which they in turn seek to reassert. The result is a level of sustained political street warfare not seen in the U.S. since the 1960s. A few weeks after the attacks in San Jose, for instance, a conservative affiliated group announced that he would host a march in Sacramento to protest the attacks at Trump rallies. Anti-Fascist Action Sacramento called for a counter-demonstration; in the end, at least 10 people were stabbed.




 
A similar cycle has played out at UC Berkeley. In February, masked antifascists broke store windows and hurled Molotov cocktails and rocks at police during a rally against the planned speech by Yiannopoulos. After the university canceled the speech out of what it called “concern for public safety,” "ALT-Right" groups announced a “March on Berkeley” in support of “free speech.” At that rally, a 41-year-old man named Kyle Chapman, who was wearing a baseball helmet, ski goggles, shin guards, and a mask, smashed an antifa activist over the head with a wooden post. Suddenly, Trump supporters had a viral video of their own. An alt-right crowdfunding site soon raised more than $80,000 for Chapman’s legal defense. (In January, the same site had offered a substantial reward for the identity of the antifascist who had punched Spencer.) A politicized fight culture is emerging, fueled by cheerleaders on both sides. As James Anderson, an editor at It’s Going Down, told Vice, “This shit is fun.”






Antifa believes it is pursuing the opposite of authoritarianism. Many of its activists oppose the very notion of a centralized state. But in the name of protecting the vulnerable, antifascists have granted themselves the authority to decide which Americans may publicly assemble and which may not. That authority rests on no democratic foundation. Unlike the politicians they revile, the men and women of antifa cannot be voted out of office. Generally, they don’t even disclose their names.
Antifa’s perceived legitimacy is inversely correlated with the government’s. Which is why, in the Trump era, the movement is growing like never before. As they believe that the the president derides and subverts liberal-democratic norms, progressives face a choice. They can recommit to the rules of fair play, and try to limit the president’s corrosive effect, though they will often fail. Or they can, in revulsion or fear or righteous rage, try to deny "Nazi"s" and Trump supporters their political rights. From Middlebury to Berkeley to Portland, the latter approach is on the rise, especially among young people.
      I am not sure what the future will bring, but I see all the fighting in the streets and I recall pictures of Germany in the 1920's and early 30's when the brown shirts squashed all dissent and burned books and other things to force people to conform to a certain ideology and if they didn't they went to one of these places..





I am afraid things will happen again like before.  When people forget the lessons of history, they are doomed to repeat it.  And the sad thing is that history isn't really taught anymore unless it is politically correct.


1 comment:

  1. I do resemble your sentiments. I think they are wildly out of control and violent at most times. And it almost feels the same as a Salem witch hunt.

    ReplyDelete